Flower Color at Butchart Gardens

Butchart Gardens covers more than 55 acres of a 130 acre estate.  Today the gardens consist of five major garden styles – The Sunken Garden, Rose Garden, Japanese Garden, Italian Garden and the Mediterranean Garden.

Each of these gardens contains a skillful combination of rare and exotic shrubs, trees and flowers.  Many of these were collected by the But chart’s during their extensive world travels.  The garden was continually expanded over the years to become world famous.

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One of the most fascinating items about the gardens is the wonderful use of flower color.  Within the meticulously cared for flower beds you will find large drifts of single flower color as well as the more interesting mixed flower color combinations.

The rich color combinations used throughout the gardens brings to mind the meaning of flower color.  While doing some research I came across these interesting facts.

Every flower color offers a rich and meaningful story dating back centuries.  Today their meanings and symbolisms still play an important role in garden design.  Here is a list of flower color and their meanings.

White – Often associated with innocence, humility and reverence.  In these flower beds white flowers are used as low growing carpets of color and as tall accent color.

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Pink – When you think of pink you think of grace, gentility and happiness.  Pink can be used on its own or with silver leaf plants for a soft elegant look.

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Red – Full of energy and represents desire, strength and passionate love.  Red is one color that can hold its own in the garden and does not need to be combined with another color.

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Purple – The origins are tied to royalty it represents dignity, pride and success.  Purple flowers range from the soft purple to dark indigo.

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Blue – Symbolizes peace, serenity and openness.  There are few true blue flowers.  However, many flowers have blue tones.

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Lavender – Similar to pink, lavender also represents refinement, grace and elegance, but at a more sophisticated level.  Whether used alone or in combination with another color, lavender flowers give a garden a soft sophisticated feel.

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Orange – Nothing is bashful about the color orange.  Orange symbolizes energy, enthusiasm and warmth.  Orange always “pops” in the garden and when used in combination with purple the energy level is raised.

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Yellow – Evokes feelings of joy and new beginnings.   When yellow flowers are used in mass planting they become the stars of the garden.

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Green – Represents health, resilience and good fortune.  Although not a common flower color several shades of green are possible.  Keep in mind certain Moss gardens consist only of shades of green.

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The next time you are planning the color scheme of your garden keep in mind the symbolism behind each flower color.  The color symbolisms are closely tied to our emotions and will influence the feeling the garden evokes.  Do you want your garden to be soft and introspective or wild and full of energy?  Or perhaps you are looking for a happy medium between the two extremes.